This site is not one I've heard about, and there are at least two other observatory-type sites we have heard about,...

This site is not one I've heard about, and there are at least two other observatory-type sites we have heard about, in casual conversation and in lectures.

This would, however, be the most engineered of them that we've heard about to date.

Originally shared by rare avis


Astronomer Dr. Duane Hamacher has been studying Indigenous Australian astronomy for years, he believes the Wurdi Youang structure could date back more than 11,000 years.

"Some academics have referred to this stone arrangement here as Australia's version of Stonehenge," Dr Hamacher said.

 "I think the question we might have to ask is: is Stonehenge Britain's version of Wurdi Youang? Because this could be much, much older."

The egg-shaped area is fifty metres wide and contains over 100 basalt boulders. After being noted by early European settlers and recorded by archaeologists in 1977, Wurdi Youang was only relatively recently given the attention it deserves as a site once sacred and significant. 

Local custodian Reg Abrahams sees the site as playing a role in contesting the increasingly-dated disproved notion that Indigenous Australians were simply nomadic hunter-gatherers.

"The mound is one of the oldest; I should say the oldest, forms of temples in the world and dates back to the Palaeolithic age with the advent of first man," Slater is alleged to have written.

Slater documented inscriptions from the site's stones, which he said were made up of hand signs, letters and "sacred signs" that amounted to 28,000 words in the ancient language.

In the 1940, the site was reportedly bulldozed by the farmer with a deed to the land, following government threats to seize his property, making further investigation virtually impossible.


more...
http://mashable.com/2016/10/12/wurdi-youang-stone-site-australia/#TzkNXTD7fSqy

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